Stourhead in the time of coronavirus

I was very lucky to visit Stourhead yesterday. Since the coronavirus started spreading amongst humans National Trust properties have been closed, but last week they started to re open just letting in a few people at a time. The tickets have to be booked and my human was online at 2am in the morning to get tickets for our visit.

Humans have to stay 2 metres apart all the time nowadays in order to stop the coronavirus from spreading. We waited to go in at specially laid out 2 metre apart bollards.

Once inside the first beautiful sight was a large patch of ox eye daisies.

We had to cross a bridge over the road to get into the main estate.

A lady at the ticket office asked for our names and ticked us off her list. She wished us a lovely afternoon.

Here I am in front of the house. At the moment only the park and garden are open.

There are some really lovely rhododendrons at Stourhead.

We had to follow a one way route. The follies that adorn the estate were all closed but I had a little peak in the window of the Temple of Flora.

There were signs to stop people going the wrong way.

I was very excited when we reached The Grotto. Bears like grottos.

The statues and grotto are over 200 years old. This statue is of a nymph.

I like the window in the grotto with the view across the lake to the Palladian Bridge.

There was a big hole in the ceiling to let the light in.

At the other end of the grotto I found the statue of The River God.

Further on on our walk around the lake was the Gothic Cottage; a really pretty little house that I would like to live in.

I climbed up and had a look inside.

Next folly on the walk was The Pantheon. This can be seen from the other side of the lake. The follies all appear in view at various points around the lake walk.

At The Temple of Appolo a statue was missing so I filled the gap for a little while.

I had to be very careful not to fall in the lake when crossing this little bridge.

I stopped for a while to look at the view across the lake. Here I could see The Temple of Flora and The Boat House.

After passing a water wheel (off limits today) and a field full of noisy sheep another grotto appeared. This one lead up towards the woods.

There were little Bear sized caves in the grotto walls.

In order to get back to the main estate I had to toddle through a creepy tunnel going under the road above.

There are lots of geese at Stourhead but they all started to walk away when they noticed me.

We found a perfect place for a little picnic with wonderful view.

Before picnic though I had to visit the Bristol Cross for a selfie, as I do live in Bristol nowadays.

The hillock that the Bristol Cross stands on is a splendid place for roly polies.

I would in normal times have cake in the cafe, but Karen’s homemade carrot cake is just as yummy; the tea from the flask is good too. I might get used to picnics.

Stourhead Garden was designed by Capability Brown over 200 years ago. It is a beautiful place and well worth a visit.

For more details see https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/stourhead.

Horace the Alresford Bear 16/6/20

1 thought on “Stourhead in the time of coronavirus

  1. Gosh that is a real Culture Day Out. You are very well educated, learning all about very important parts of our Heritage. You also enjoy the little bear size nooks and crannies, and obviously relish a lovely slice of yummy cake when you have a break. Keep it up my lovely friend, I’m always interested in your ,adventures Xx Xx you never disappoint Keep safe sweetie Xx 😚

    Like

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